Dresden businesses – In Dresden http://in-dresden.info/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 00:02:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://in-dresden.info/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T214522.892-150x150.jpg Dresden businesses – In Dresden http://in-dresden.info/ 32 32 The Dresden family star in new TV series We Bought A Funeral Home https://in-dresden.info/the-dresden-family-star-in-new-tv-series-we-bought-a-funeral-home/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 21:42:41 +0000 https://in-dresden.info/the-dresden-family-star-in-new-tv-series-we-bought-a-funeral-home/ Breadcrumb Links Television New Local News Entertainment DRESDEN — There probably aren’t many residents living here who haven’t visited Arryn and Heather Blumberg’s home, but it was likely to see a dearly deceased relative or friend. Arryn and Heather Blumberg are seen outside an old funeral home they bought in Dresden. Their renovation of the […]]]>

DRESDEN — There probably aren’t many residents living here who haven’t visited Arryn and Heather Blumberg’s home, but it was likely to see a dearly deceased relative or friend.

Content of the article

DRESDEN — There probably aren’t many residents living here who haven’t visited Arryn and Heather Blumberg’s home, but it was likely to see a dearly deceased relative or friend.

Advertisement 2

Content of the article

Now, many more people will get to see much of the $400,000 renovation the couple did to their 38-bedroom, 1,115-square-meter (12,000-square-foot home) on the first episode of We Bought. A Funeral Home airs Saturday on the Discovery+ streaming service.

Arryn Blumberg said he saw an online article about the Dresden property in Narcity, an online publication, in winter 2020 after the couple decided to leave Toronto during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“But it wasn’t listed as a funeral home,” Heather Blumberg said.

After some “cyberbullying”, she said the couple quickly learned about the former use of the vast house.

Tom and Linda DeBurger owned and operated Thomas L. DeBurger Funeral Home for more than four decades before retiring six years ago. The house, built in the 1880s, was first used as a funeral home in the early 1920s by Wilson Clark.

Advertisement 3

Content of the article

“We decided to buy it within the first 10 minutes,” said Arryn Blumberg. “(His story) really didn’t bother us at all. … Generally, funerals are places where people come to celebrate something.

Describing the rite as a celebration of love, Heather said “that’s what the house gives off to us”.

After a follow-up story from Narcity about the Blumbergs’ purchase of the property, Heather was contacted by Heart Hat Entertainment to see if they would be interested in discussing the possibility of a TV show.

“Next thing I know we’re here and we’re shooting a sizzle reel (short promo demo) and the next minute a couple different networks wanted it,” she said. “Before we knew it, we were signed up to do a TV show.”

Advertisement 4

Content of the article

Noting that the family loves Halloween, Arryn said the new series “is a great way to play” with the holiday.

Heather said it took around 18 months to film the episodes, adding that it was interesting to see how their children – son Rafferty, now 21, and daughter Noa, now 14 – turned out. grew up during this period.

“It was a trip,” she said. “It was a lot more intense than I thought, we imagined.”

But, she added, they worked with a great team that made the experience fun.

“It took a lot of learning,” Arryn said. “I think episode one is going to be a lot clumsier than episode six. We hope people stick with it a bit, because we’re not viewers. We are not actors.

Promoted as part of the Discovery + Ghostober lineup, We Bought A Funeral Home is described as “an eerie news series that will unveil an unconventional side to the field of home improvement”.

Advertisement 5

Content of the article

The promo for the first episode states, “The Blumbergs will encounter a series of chilling events while settling into their new funeral home.”

Stating that he was “not a believer”, Arryn said the house was still “100% haunted”.

“In particular, there’s a lady shouting ‘Hello,'” Heather said.

They both heard her, they added,

Arryn said there were times when he was home during the day and heard what he thought was someone yelling at him, so he yelled back.

Afterwards, he texts Heather and learns that she is not home.

Over the years, people have also seen a lady in a blue dress standing on the main staircase. The Blumbergs said the story behind this reported appearance would be revealed on the show.

Advertising 6

Content of the article

However, the family is not disturbed by the unexplained noises that have occurred in the house.

“There’s nothing threatening about it,” Heather said.

The series will also highlight the impressive renovation the house has undergone, led by Heather, an interior designer. However, the Blumbergs are under contract not to reveal any details, especially images, until the start of the series, meaning The Chatham Daily News could only take one picture showing the exterior of the house.

In fact, they had to be careful what you see in the photos they post on social media.

Arryn said the family is proud of Heather’s design work.

“Making it look like a home took a long time,” he added.

Heather said the conversion of viewing areas from the Old Funeral Home required extensive plumbing, HVAC and electrical work.

Advertising 7

Content of the article

A former observation area has been transformed into a kitchen with a massive central island. Another interesting feature of the house is a speakeasy room, complete with a coffin-turned-bar. Renovations to turn the former casket showroom into a home theater, as well as the addition of a personal gymnasium, are also underway.

Heather said that since the series trailer was released, she has received a lot of attention from the United States, including requests from a design publication.

“We love this place and we hope people will like it and want to know more,” she said.

Because there is such a community connection, Arryn said virtually everything comes from the area for their home renovation.

Where possible, they also asked the production company to hire local people to be part of the film crew, Heather added.

Advertisement 1

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

]]>
Exelon moves forward with plan to close Byron and Dresden nuclear power plants https://in-dresden.info/exelon-moves-forward-with-plan-to-close-byron-and-dresden-nuclear-power-plants/ Wed, 28 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://in-dresden.info/exelon-moves-forward-with-plan-to-close-byron-and-dresden-nuclear-power-plants/ Citing the lack of agreement on clean energy legislation, Exelon Generation plans to file decommissioning plans for its nuclear plants in Byron and Dresden. The filings, which company officials said they plan to submit to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are part of the final stages of retirement from the plants, which have been in operation […]]]>

Citing the lack of agreement on clean energy legislation, Exelon Generation plans to file decommissioning plans for its nuclear plants in Byron and Dresden.

The filings, which company officials said they plan to submit to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are part of the final stages of retirement from the plants, which have been in operation for decades.

Byron would close in September, followed by Dresden in November.

A spokesperson for Exelon told the Sun-Times that while the company remains hopeful that “clean energy legislation will pass in time for us to reverse these actions,” it must continue to take necessary action. to close factories.

A key lawmaker who has worked on the energy bill said Exelon’s announcement on Wednesday aligns with the timeline the company set earlier this year for plant closures.

“I’m not sure that changes anything,” said Sen. Bill Cunningham, D-Chicago. “We hope that stakeholders will continue to work over the remainder of the summer, to reach an agreement that will lead to the drafting and adoption of an omnibus energy bill, and this desire existed before Exelon published this statement today, and it will also exist tomorrow.

State Senator Bill Cunningham speaks during a bill signing ceremony at Southside Occupational Academy High School on Wednesday.
Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times

When announcing the decision, Exelon officials said they also plan to issue job cut notices to employees. Staff at the power plant numbered around 1,500 when plans to withdraw the facilities were announced last August. This figure could drop to 30 to 40 employees over the next 10 years.

“With no signs of a breakthrough in clean energy legislation in Springfield, we have no choice but to take these final steps toward plant closures,” said Dave Rhoades. , nuclear director of Exelon Generation, in a press release announcing the filings.

“We will never stop fighting for policies to preserve Illinois’ nuclear fleet, knowing that the minute these plants close, our customers will experience dirtier air and higher energy costs. But time is running out, we must plan for the future and do all we can to prepare our employees and the communities they serve for what lies ahead.

Without legislation, the company could also shut down its Braidwood and LaSalle nuclear facilities over the “coming years,” according to the company’s statement.

Asked if the rollback plan was announced to pressure Springfield into passing legislation, an Exelon spokesperson told the Sun-Times that the move was necessary, although the company remains hopeful that the legislature can still pass a bill.

This 2011 photo shows steam rising from Exelon Corp's nuclear power plant.  in Byron, Illinois.

This 2011 photo shows steam rising from Exelon Corp’s nuclear power plant. in Byron, Illinois.
Robert Ray/AP File

“We understand lawmakers continue to work on a legislative solution that would preserve Illinois’ nuclear fleet and we remain hopeful that clean energy legislation will pass in time for us to reverse these actions,” Paul Adams said. , the spokesperson in a statement.

“However, with no certainty that a bill will pass, we need to take the final steps towards plant closures, and that includes completing regulatory filings such as the one we filed today with the NRC. “

The decision also ties into refueling the power plants, a “complex” process that costs “tens of millions of dollars, takes weeks, and requires more than 1,000 outside contractors,” Adams said.

“Whether to stop or refuel is not a decision that can be made at the last minute, and we are currently only weeks away from Byron’s retirement date in mid -September,” Adams said in his statement.

A spokesman for Senate Speaker Don Harmon said negotiations are ongoing.

State Senate Speaker Don Harmon in 2017.

State Senate Speaker Don Harmon in 2017.
Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times File

“Discussions continue as everyone involved seeks to strike the right balance for a future renewable, reliable and affordable energy plan,” Harmon spokesman John Patterson said in a statement. “This is a complex situation involving thousands of jobs, our climate future, and every Illinois’ electric bill, so clearly we want to get it right.”

A spokeswoman for Gov. JB Pritzker said the governor’s office presented a “comprehensive energy package” that would preserve jobs, put the state on a path to 100% clean energy by 2050 and include reforms ethics.

“The administration hopes the legislature will vote quickly on this compromise bill, which the governor will immediately sign into law,” the spokeswoman said in a statement.

The Bryron nuclear power plant shortly before it opened in 1985.

The Bryron nuclear power plant shortly before it opened in 1985.
AP file

Cunningham, who served as the state Senate’s lead negotiator on the energy bill, said most of the discussion around the legislation has been between environmental groups and labor unions.

There has been progress, “but it’s very slow, incremental progress,” the Beverly Democrat said.

Cunningham said if environmentalists and workers reached an agreement it would be “much easier” to move forward with the legislation.

Asked if he expected to be back in Springfield before the General Assembly’s scheduled veto session in October, Cunningham said that depended on whether or not a deal was reached. get the votes needed to pass.

Byron Generating Station, near the Rock River Valley in Ogle County, has been in operation for over 30 years. The Dresden power plant in Grundy county has been supplying electricity for more than 40 years.

Dresden nuclear power plant.

Dresden nuclear power plant.
1997 provided photo.

]]>